Loading... Please wait...

Single Vs Double Beadlock: Which is Better?

Posted

Whether it be for a new wheel build or a beadlock conversion, one of the most common questions people ask us is "Should I do a single or double beadlock?"

The short answer is that any beadlock is better than no beadlock, or rim screws or glue.

Unsightly rim screw holes Messy residue from glue

(Above left: unsightly rim screw holes. Above right: messy residue from glue on an older non beadlocked wheel)

While a double beadlock isn't ever a bad choice (as long as it can be done; we'll get into that below.), sometimes a single beadlock is as good of a fit at a savings to you.

So, let's discuss some factors that affect whether you should consider a single or double beadlock:

1) Technical requirements for fitment

2) Current setup/feel

3) Budget/weight/looks

Technical Requirements:

The first thing to mention here is that a single beadlock has very few technical requirements. We can do a single beadlock on just about any 15" wheel, and all of our Champion Wheel brand wheels come with at least a single beadlock.

When we get into double beadlocks, there are a few technical specs to consider:

-Brake clearance- the inside diameter of all our 15" beadlocks is 13.25". We recommend you have a caliper outside diameter of no greater than 13.0". Here is a link that will help you measure your brake OD: https://www.championbillet.com/brake-clearance/

If your brakes are larger than 13.0" OD, you would not be able to run a double beadlock, but a single would still be an option.

-Backspace- Certain wheels have geometry that prevents the tires from being mounted on a double beadlock wheel. In this case, you would still be able to do a single beadlock.

We have developed our Champion Wheel brand wheels to work at any backspace with a double beadlock (you would still need to measure brake clearance!), but if you are looking to do a double beadlock conversion on a different manufacturer's wheel, this is an important point to remember. Each manufacturer is different, so we recommend measuring your backspace, then contacting us to discuss your application further.

Current Setup/Feel: 

Once you get past the technical requirements, if you are still not sure about what you need, consider how your current setup is working.

-Are you running glue, screws, or perhaps nothing at all to retain your tires?

-How are your screws holding up?

-Have you marked your tires to see how far they spin with each pass?

-How particular are you about the feel of your tires?

If you are relatively happy with your current setup but looking for extra safety and cleaner, easier tire mounting, the single beadlock would more than suffice.

If you are unhappy with an inconsistent feel or are seeing consistent and significant tire rotation, a double beadlock would be the best choice for you. While a single beadlock will stabilize your tire bead, giving you better performance and feel, the double will do a more thorough job.

If the lips of your wheels are damaged from repeated use of rim screws, a beadlock conversion would remove the damage and give you a fresh start to mounting tires. We could do this on either one or both sides of the wheel.

(Above: CWI Beadlock in gold anodize on our Speed Series wheel)

Budget/Weight/Looks:

We have a wide range of beadlock styles and prices. This nearly guarantees that we have something to fit your taste and budget. This link will show all the styles we offer, along with pricing: Beadlock Conversions. We offer the same beadlocks for conversions that we install brand new on our Champion Wheel brand wheels.

As far as quality goes, all of our beadlocks are built with 6061 T6 aluminum, grade 8 hardware, and steel nut inserts for longevity. Buying a single beadlock, or a less expensive model of Champion beadlock won't compromise the quality of materials or workmanship that we put into your wheel or beadlock.

Our beadlocks range from 4.0 (X or XV beadlock) to 5.4 pounds (C1 or Wave beadlock) each. 

While you would still gain in performance with the addition of a beadlock, many people choose to get a beadlock entirely for the race styling that it adds to the car. This is perfectly okay! In this case, we'd recommend a single, as it saves on weight and cost, while still getting the look you're going for.

Conclusion

There are many considerations for getting either a single or double beadlock. The bottom line is that every application is different, and we'd be happy to go over your setup directly with you to help you decide.

There is no wrong way to go, and we can always go back later and add a backside beadlock if you decide to start out with a single.

Feel free to call or e-mail with your specific questions, and we'll make sure to get your set up right away.


newsletter